IoT Teddy Bear Hacked

Author: Martin Voelk
March 1, 2017

Whilst this sounds funny at first, it’s yet another serious data breach of customer data. IoT is becoming hacker’s first choice even before web applications these days. So don’t forget to have your IoT devices Pen Tested.

https://arstechnica.com/security/2017/02/creepy-iot-teddy-bear-leaks-2-million-parents-and-kids-voice-messages/ 

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IoT – the popular attack vector

Author: Martin Voelk
January 23, 2017

Evolving technologies such a IoT (Internet of Things) enable IP based Internetworking with devices previously not part of the network. Fitness machines, Home Protection Systems, Automation systems, Industrial processing systems, medical equipment, Burglary systems, temperature controls etc.

The downside to IoT is that it opens up a whole new attack vector. Not only can poorly protection IoT machines be compromised, they also can serve as a jump host to further penetrate the customer network.

Shodan is the tool of choice these days. A lot of the underground community is actively exchanging scripts with the best IoT dorks. Only because there is a treadmill on the web doesn’t mean that you can leave the default username and password!

https://www.shodan.io

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Map Real Time Cyber Attacks

Author: Satish Arthar
May 4, 2016

It seems nearly every day we’re reading about Internet attacks aimed at knocking sites offline and breaking into networks, but it’s often difficult to visualize this type of activity. In this post, we’ll take a look at multiple ways of tracking online attacks and attackers around the globe and in real-time.

 

A couple of notes about these graphics. Much of the data that powers these live maps is drawn from a mix of actual targets and “honeypots,” decoy systems that security firms deploy to gather data about the sources, methods and frequency of online attacks. Also, the organizations referenced in some of these maps as “attackers” typically are compromised systems within those organizations that are being used to relay attacks launched from someplace else.

 
The main method is by getting reports back from Intrusion Detection Systems. So each attack that hits an IDS is reported back you have the source of the attack – which may not be the instigator – just the ip registered as attacking you. and of course the target is known to the IDS as the IDS IS the target.The IDS could be software or hardware based.

 

FireEye Cyber Threat Map, While the FireEye Cyber Threat Map doesn’t technically operate in real time, it does generate a very interesting picture of how surreptitiously installed malware communicates with the server systems that are remotely controlling the malicious software.

 

 

Screenshot

 

 

My favorite – and perhaps the easiest way to lose track of half your workday (and bandwidth) comes from the folks at Norse Corp. Their map – IPViking – includes a wealth of data about each attack, such as the attacking organization name and Internet address, the target’s city and service being attacked, as well as the most popular target countries and origin countries.

 

 

Screenshot from 2016-05-04 14:45:27

 

 
Another live service with oodles of information about each attack comes from Arbor Networks’ Digital Attack map. Arbor says the map is powered by data fed from 270+ ISP customers worldwide who have agreed to share anonymous network traffic and attack statistics.

 

 

Screenshot from 2016-05-04 14:13:50

 

 

Kaspersky’s Cyberthreat Real-time Map is a lot of fun to play with, and probably looks the most like an interactive video game. Beneath the 3-D eye candy and kaleidoscopic map is anonymized data from Kaspersky’s various scanning services. As such, this fairly interactive map lets you customize its layout by filtering certain types of malicious threats, such as email malware, Web site attacks, vulnerability scans, etc.

 

 

Screenshot from 2016-05-04 21:12:33

 

 

The Cyberfeed, from Anubis Networks, takes the visitor on an automated tour of the world, using something akin to Google Earth and map data based on infections from the top known malware families. It’s a neat idea, but more of a malware infection map than an attack map, and not terribly interactive either. In this respect, it’s a lot like the threat map from Finnish security firm F-Secure, the Global Botnet Threat Activity Map from Trend Micro, and Team Cymru’s Internet Malicious Activity Map.

 

 

The Honeynet Project’s Honey Map is not super sexy but it does include a fair amount of useful information about real-time threats on honeypot systems, including links to malware analysis from Virustotal for each threat or attack.

 

 

Additionally, the guys at OpenDNS Labs have a decent attack tracker that includes some nifty data and graphics.

 

Speaking of attacks, some of you may have noticed that this site was unreachable for several hours over the last few days. That’s because it has been under fairly constant assault by the same criminals who attacked Sony and Microsoft’s gaming networks on Christmas Day. We are moving a few things around to prevent further such disruptions, so you may notice that some of the site’s features are a tad flaky or slow for a few days.

 

We made ths post becoz, we Cyber51 decided to build one of our own. When we started more focused on user experience and information accessibility. We were able to create a close to real time cyber attack monitoring system that is engaging, interactive, and insightful. Soon it may suprise you all with nice some functions.

 

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